Equipment

Microphones

  • The microphone I used at WordCamp Minneapolis/St. Paul 2017 was a Sennheiser MD 46 with a Tascam DR-10X Plug-On Micro Linear PCM Recorder (XLR)
  • I’ve also made good use of my Tascom Dr-07. The mic picks up more ambient noise than the Sennheiser mentioned above.
  • Here’s an article about choosing a microphone.
  • How do you record a phone conversation is a common question that you will see in the various podcast forums. There are multiple ways to do this. My goal was to use something that did not require any extra software or technical skills on the part of the interviewee. So I’ve used the Sangean DAR-101 Professional Grade Digital MP3 Recorder. On my end, this works with a landline.
  • People also record Skype calls.
  • I recently set up a Google Voice number. I’d like to experiment with gathering answers to the Question of the Day by having people leave a message.
  • Your microphone doesn’t have to be crazy expensive. Just by using an external microphone and getting it closer to the source and away from noise (for example the noise the computer is making or the hum of a refrigerator) will improve the sound quite a bit.
  • Booth Junkie is a YouTube channel that covers many questions podcasters have about recording.
  • Transom.org also covers podcasting equipment, including microphone choices.

Audio Editing Software

Sony Sound Forge

I use a PC. I’ve used Sony Sound Forge to cut my audio, fix plosives, level the sound, etc. I like the software fine and if I upgraded, I’d probably like it even better. Once I have my clips prepared, I arrange them and add whatever music I’m using in Adobe Premiere Pro. Yep. That’s video editing software. It’s not the way most podcasters would approach this, but alas I am not alone. I’m certain I could mix what I need to mix in Sound Forge if I took to time to figure it out. I’m just doing what I know because it’s easier.

Hindenburg & ProTools

I also have a copy of Hindenburg. An audio engineer I met at a Twin Cites Podcasters Meetup had a look at it and was really impressed. He suggested that I invest some time in learning how to use it. He, the professional, on the other hand, uses ProTools.

Reaper

  • Another audio engineer I met at a Twin Cities Podcasters MeetUp recommended Reaper. It’s very affordable compared to other options.
  • Booth Junkie features several videos about using Reaper. Even if you are using a different “DAW” (Digital Audio Workstation), you’ll find the explanation of things like EQ very helpful whenever you’re ready to get into more details about how to make your recordings sound their best.
  • Audacity

    I’ve never used it, but Audacity is free and available on multiple platforms. I know people who use it and they tell me that it is sufficient for their needs as a podcaster. There’s something to be said for free and simple for those who are just beginning.

    Garage Band

    If you’re on a Mac, I know that some like Garage Band. I gave it a very brief try on my iPad and it didn’t take for me, but I know people who love it.

    BossJock

    BossJock has some impressive endorsements. If you want to try something using your iPhone or iPad, this might be the ticket.

    Artwork

    Your podcast will need artwork if you want to be listed in the directories. I used a free program called Inkscape to make my simple logo for QuOTeD.